Published On: Sun, Sep 4th, 2016

27 Indian journalists investigating corruption murdered


27 Indian journalists investigating corruption murdered

NEW DELHI: As many as 27 journalists have been murdered in India in direct retaliation for their work since 1992, according to a report by the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), a non-profit organisation based in New York.

The CPJ’s latest report, ‘Dangerous pursuit: In India, journalists who cover corruption may pay with their lives’, tells the stories of Jagendra Singh in Uttar Pradesh, Umesh Rajput in Chhattisgarh and Akshay Singh in Madhya Pradesh.

“The challenges faced by India’s press are highlighted by the cases of Jagendra Singh, Umesh Rajput, and Akshay Singh. Corruption was the impetus for all three journalists’ final reports and in all three cases, there have been no convictions,” CPJ wrote in the report.

Freelancer Jagendra Singh, who died after being set on fire allegedly by the police in June 2015, was investigating allegations that a local minister was involved in land grabs and a rape. Before he was shot dead in January 2011, Umesh Rajput was investigating allegations of medical negligence and claims that the son of a politician was involved illegal gambling.

Investigative reporter Akshay Singh was working on a story linked to the US $1 billion Vyapam admissions scandal — tests for professional jobs run by the Madhya Pradesh government — “when he died unexpectedly in July 2015”.

Assam, Uttar Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir are the most dangerous areas to report from (statistics do not put Chhattisgarh in the top three), given their “volatile” institutional structures and “complex” civil societies, the report said.

Reporters Without Borders (RSF), a global advocacy, called India “Asia’s deadliest country for media personnel, ahead of both Pakistan and Afghanistan”, IndiaSpend reported in April 2016.

The CPJ report also shows how small-town journalists face greater risks than those from larger cities, and how India’s culture of impunity is leaving the country’s media vulnerable to threats and attacks.

“They rarely get support from their employers if they are targeted,” Sujata Madhok, general secretary of the Delhi Union of Journalists, told CPJ. “The gulf between journalists working in rural or remote areas and those working in big cities is huge”.

Courtesy: Samaa

About the Author

Syed Ammar Alavi

- is Lahore (Pakistan) based journalist & writer with 25-year experience in print, wire and broadcast forms of journalism. His major fields of interest are politics, film,tv,sports, climate change and technology