Published On: Sat, Jul 30th, 2016

A ‘seed of hope’ for transgender people in Arab communities

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Israeli Arab Talleen Abu Hanna, 21, poses on stage after she was announced as the first Miss Trans Israel beauty pageant, at HaBima, Israel's national theater in Tel Aviv, Israel, Friday, May 27, 2016. Abu Hanna, an Israeli from a Catholic Arab family has been crowned the winner of the country's first transgender pageant. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Israeli Arab Talleen Abu Hanna, 21, poses on stage after she was announced as the first Miss Trans Israel beauty pageant, at HaBima, Israel’s national theater in Tel Aviv, Israel, Friday, May 27, 2016. Abu Hanna, an Israeli from a Catholic Arab family has been crowned the winner of the country’s first transgender pageant. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

TEL AVIV, July 30 — When Talleen Abu Hanna was a boy in Nazareth, an Arab city in Israel, he gave up karate and took up ballet. As a teenager, he stole his mother’s makeup and his sister’s dresses. He and his buddies would change in gas stations outside town, then party at nearby gay clubs.

“They would see boys going in, and we would put on our eye shadow, our wigs and skirts and dresses, and walk out and say, ‘Hiiii,’” Abu Hanna, 21, said in a recent interview, drawing out the last word.

In her teenage days, she said, she favoured a look she described as Arab kitsch — heavy eyeliner, blush and foundation, topped with a cheap wig. After returning home, she had to remember to bite off her fake nails and replace her sparkly iPhone covers with plain leather ones.

But it was at one of those parties, when she was 15 or so, that Abu Hanna met a woman who told her that she used to be a man. Laughing, Abu Hanna asked her friends what “that lady” was smoking. Her friends, laughing as well, explained gender reassignment surgery to her.

The explanation came as a revelation to Abu Hanna, who had always assumed she would live her life as a very effeminate gay man. “I said: OMG, really? Seriously?” she said. “There are people who are like me? And then the idea came in my head, and I held on to it like a rope that would save me.”

In the spring, a year after transitioning from male to female, Abu Hanna became Israel’s first transgender beauty queen, winning the Miss Trans Israel pageant, a Swarovski-studded crown that barely made it over her hair-sprayed updo, and something she values more: visibility, for herself and for a cause she believes in.

“She was so beautiful, impressive,” said Israela Lev, a transgender activist who organised the pageant and initially spotted Abu Hanna at a sushi restaurant in a mall.

Contestants wait for their run backstage during the first Miss Trans Israel beauty pageant at HaBima, Israel's national theater in Tel Aviv, Israel, Friday, May 27, 2016. Talleen Abu Hanna, 21, an Israeli from a Catholic Arab family has been crowned the winner of the country's first transgender pageant.(AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Contestants wait for their run backstage during the first Miss Trans Israel beauty pageant at HaBima, Israel’s national theater in Tel Aviv, Israel, Friday, May 27, 2016. Talleen Abu Hanna, 21, an Israeli from a Catholic Arab family has been crowned the winner of the country’s first transgender pageant.(AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Now, Abu Hanna is looking ahead to a bigger stage: The global transgender pageant, Miss Trans Star International, in Barcelona, Spain, on September 17.

“I think winning the crown in Barcelona will give some hope, like planting a seed of hope” for other transgender people, she said. “Imagine because of who you are, you have to leave your family, home and country — I am speaking of Arab countries.”

She plans to represent Israel out of “respect, because it is a democracy that has given me peace between my soul and my body.”

She will represent perhaps Israel’s most cosmopolitan face, an Arab transgender woman who comfortably crosses between Palestinians and Israelis, among Muslims, Jews and Christians.

Her Instagram account shows a woman who joyfully lip-syncs to cheesy songs in Arabic and Hebrew. Her ex-boyfriend is Muslim — his name, Mohammed, is tattooed on her wrist — and there is a mezuza on her door. She is from Israel’s Catholic community, a tiny subset of the Palestinian minority that forms one-fifth of the country’s eight million citizens.

“I’m Arab. I’m Christian. I’m Israeli. All that is tied together,” Abu Hanna said. “And I’m going to win.”

She has a good chance, said Thara Wells, the director of the pageant, because she has buzz as well as beauty.

“Her story is so different,” Wells said.

A ‘seed of hope’ for transgender people in Arab communities (2)

But nothing is simple in this part of the world. Even among gay people, her quest for the beauty crown has drawn criticism. Leading Palestinian groups for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people declined to comment on Abu Hanna’s activities. But gay and transgender activists say the groups see her decision to represent Israel as “pinkwashing,” a term that critics use to describe how Israel markets its gay-friendly reputation to shift focus from military occupation.

Lilach Ben David, 26, a transgender woman and activist, said she was “torn.”

“Talleen Abu Hanna will most definitely be used by the Israeli propaganda machine in order to justify horrendous crimes against Talleen Abu Hanna’s own people,” Ben David said.

But “if Palestinian society was accepting of Talleen Abu Hanna as a trans woman,” she said, “then she wouldn’t have to go and work with the Israeli establishment.”

Being openly gay and then transgender in that conservative Palestinian society was never going to be easy for Abu Hanna. Her father and much of her extended family cut off relations with her years ago, after she was outed by an angry boy scout in her troop who found out Abu Hanna kept a second Facebook profile as a woman.

The scandal shook Abu Hanna’s family. Fearing violence at the hands of a vindictive relative, her mother gave her US$100 (RM100) so she could flee, which she did — first to a Palestinian friend in Haifa, Israel, and then to Tel Aviv.

“Ummi” — “Mum” in Arabic — decorates one of her wrists, a tattoo of gratitude because, she said, her mother keeps in touch.

Someday, Abu Hanna said, she hopes to counsel Arab parents to accept their transgender children. She then began a rehearsed speech on the subject — but when asked about her own father, she paused.

Of course her father loved her, even if he cut off relations, she said. It was the shame he encountered from his community that kept him away.

“My father should be proud of me,” Abu Hanna said, tapping the table with her long nails. “My father is the father of Miss Trans Israel.” — The New York Times

News Source The Malay Mail Online

 

About the Author

Syed Ammar Alavi

- is Lahore (Pakistan) based journalist & writer with 25-year experience in print, wire and broadcast forms of journalism. His major fields of interest are politics, film,tv,sports, climate change and technology

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