Published On: Sun, Nov 15th, 2015

Five Books Every Parent Should Read To Their Children

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Bedtime stories have been shown to increase the performance of children in school. On Children’s Day, we present five classics that parents should read to their children.

Corduroy

Written by Don Freeman, this book was named by the National Education Association as one of its 'Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children and among the Top 100 Picture Books of all time. The story is about a teddy bear called Corduroy and a little girl Lisa, who spots him in the department store and wants to take him home against her mother's wishes. The book is about their friendship and how both Corduroy and Lisa wanted a friend - and ends with both of them hugging each other.

Written by Don Freeman, this book was named by the National Education Association as one of its ‘Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children and among the Top 100 Picture Books of all time. The story is about a teddy bear called Corduroy and a little girl Lisa, who spots him in the department store and wants to take him home against her mother’s wishes. The book is about their friendship and how both Corduroy and Lisa wanted a friend – and ends with both of them hugging each other.

Harold and the Purple Crayon

A 1955 children's book by Crockett Johnson, this is about a curious 4-year-old boy named Harold, who with his purple crayon creates a magical world of his own. He wants to go for a walk in the moonlight - but there is no moon. He, therefore, draws a path and has many adventures which he creates with his crayon. The book became so popular that a series has been made on Harold.

A 1955 children’s book by Crockett Johnson, this is about a curious 4-year-old boy named Harold, who with his purple crayon creates a magical world of his own. He wants to go for a walk in the moonlight – but there is no moon. He, therefore, draws a path and has many adventures which he creates with his crayon. The book became so popular that a series has been made on Harold.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

A childhood classic by Eric Carle, this book has sold 30 million copies globally. It's about a caterpillar who, after hatching, eats away through an apple first on Monday - and the next day, makes his way through three plums. The diet of the caterpillar may not be an accurate presentation, but the story does reflect Lepidoptera life stages and transformations, including metamorphosis from 'hungry caterpillar' to 'beautiful butterfly'. It has been endorsed by the Royal Entomological Society.

A childhood classic by Eric Carle, this book has sold 30 million copies globally. It’s about a caterpillar who, after hatching, eats away through an apple first on Monday – and the next day, makes his way through three plums. The diet of the caterpillar may not be an accurate presentation, but the story does reflect Lepidoptera life stages and transformations, including metamorphosis from ‘hungry caterpillar’ to ‘beautiful butterfly’. It has been endorsed by the Royal Entomological Society.

Wishing Chair

Written by Enid Blyton, the famous adventures of Peter and Mollie on buying a birthday gift - which as luck would have it, happens to be a wishing chair - for their mother, take the readers to faraway places, like the Land of Dreams, villages, and Mister Grim's School for Bad Brownies.

Written by Enid Blyton, the famous adventures of Peter and Mollie on buying a birthday gift – which as luck would have it, happens to be a wishing chair – for their mother, take the readers to faraway places, like the Land of Dreams, villages, and Mister Grim’s School for Bad Brownies.

The Giving Tree

Written by Shel Silvertein, this touching story speaks about the gift of giving. Every day, a boy would come to a tree to eat her apples, swing from her branches, or slide down her trunk and this made the tree happy. But as the boy grew older, he began to want more and more from the tree, and the tree did not disappoint him. By the time the boy became an old man, he had used so much of what the tree had to give that all that was left was a stump. Yet, all the old man needed at this point was a place to sit and rest - a function the stump happily served.

Written by Shel Silvertein, this touching story speaks about the gift of giving. Every day, a boy would come to a tree to eat her apples, swing from her branches, or slide down her trunk and this made the tree happy. But as the boy grew older, he began to want more and more from the tree, and the tree did not disappoint him. By the time the boy became an old man, he had used so much of what the tree had to give that all that was left was a stump. Yet, all the old man needed at this point was a place to sit and rest – a function the stump happily served.

About the Author

Syed Ammar Alavi

- is Lahore (Pakistan) based journalist & writer with 25-year experience in print, wire and broadcast forms of journalism. His major fields of interest are politics, film,tv,sports, climate change and technology

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