Published On: Wed, Jul 29th, 2015

14 Versions Of Microsoft

745 views

London : With the launch of the latest Windows version—Windows 10— we look back at the history and earlier versions of the iconic operating system (OS)
Windows 1
1985

 

windows1_f642882ce07427153194a5656c36ef60

Released to muted acclaim, this was essentially MS DOS with some applications sporting an interface. The original name was ‘Interface Manager’ before someone in marketing came up with ‘Windows’. And the rest was, well, history!
Windows 2
1987

 

windows2_8c12e83c7fdd3eebed270f4f3f989400

With graphical versions of Excel and Word applications, Windows’ user base was further boosted when the then popular Aldus PageMaker was released as a Windows version
Windows 3
1990

 

windows3_54f73ea2f0f003ce5e1feaf2cdcc564d

Featuring a graphical interface comparable to the Apple Macintosh, this was the most successful version of Windows to date. It offered better stability, wider support of MS DOS applications. Later versions ushered in multimedia capabilities and also peer-to-peer networking
Windows NT
1993

 

windowsnt_3062113841e71825b598b7b41df8e680

This was a new operating system derived from various ventures, including IBM, and expertise from other countries. Windows introduced a 32-bit application program interface (API) and now had an OS to handle the needs of the growing LAN networks. NT started a new branch of Server OS*

*NT’s architecture continued into Windows 2000. While NT features appeared in XP as well, it later branched off into a separate Server OS; Server 2003, 2008 and 2012
Windows 95
1995

 

windows95_b0369f248f67de16cc63683f9ffcf4ce

 

 

The Start Menu and Taskbar originated in Windows 95. This version also introduced Plug and Play
Windows 98
1998

 

windows98_453bf8896cf2491b0245fa332199a623

Along with stability and performance enhancements, it included Internet Explorer 5 and Wake-On-Lan

Windows 2000
2000

 

windows2000_61df46f6a0f1d423c230494d8091322b

This version expanded hardware support for Firewire, USB devices and wireless products. Resource hungry, this wasn’t aimed at the consumer market
Windows Millennium Edition
2000

 

windowsme_24d43f18c0ecb569100092bf5465f2a5

Many would argue that it was best forgotten. This was the last DOS-based OS from Microsoft. It diod introduce a feature—System Restore—which continued into later versions
Windows XP
2001

 

windowsxp_3b922eba162a05b983a611b9484904aa

XP was a solid OS that provided reliable service. It finally brought together the Windows NT and 95/98 lines into a new build
Windows Vista
2007

 

windowsvista_38d2d5f59a68efd485124004014dd250

This had a new visual design with AERO. The increased graphics proved too much for many laptops and PCs
Windows 7
2009

 

windows7_2d46fb19cd31bce20dc1a68fd46e255c

This was a stable OS that fixed most of the problems from Vista. It was viable replacement for XP
Windows 8
2012

 

windows8_28d691399a277464fb7f0ab8c217e45b

This was a complete break with the traditional Microsoft OS. Visually appealing with the modern Metro user interface, there were new features designed for touch/tablets and not just keyboards and mouses. The Start button was also removed and apps were introduced, but it was not well received by end users
Windows 8.1
2013

 

windows81_cce77bc650da8ad4552b24aeccc3591b

The Start button returned to this OS of two halves. It was the best of Windows 7 with apps and improved touch capability
Windows 10
2015

 

windows10_c15a38e3ee01974d40e6febb9608df3e

The Start menu is back, though it doesn’t take over the screen. With a full touch functionality, it works equally well with keyboards and mouses. It’s great for Desktop users and resizes to fit any device. Direct X12 promises to deliver better graphics
Microsoft announced that this will be the “last ever” version of Windows. Future revisions will be made via regular online updates. The company will roll out Windows 10 in 190 countries and 111 languages

Source: microsofttraining.net

About the Author

Syed Ammar Alavi

- is Lahore (Pakistan) based journalist & writer with 25-year experience in print, wire and broadcast forms of journalism. His major fields of interest are politics, film,tv,sports, climate change and technology