Published On: Mon, Aug 15th, 2016

Where to move to have the shortest workdays

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If you work to live rather than the other way around, a quick read through this article could give you a wise career move.

Because the most productive countries in the world are offering the shortest workdays.

Doing overtime for promotions, good for you, but slogging in those extra is not what you call productivity at all.

Last year, a poll conducted by an international internet-based market research firm showed that working only seven hours a day is ideal for productivity levels.

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Recently, Expert Market examined gross domestic product data from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to discover that of the 10 countries with the highest GDP, seven of those, which includes Luxembourg, Norway, Switzerland, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and Sweden also make the top 10 list for the shortest working hours.

 

The top 10 list of productive countries (GDP divided by hours worked) is below:

 

1- Luxembourg – 1643 average annual hours with $59.05 hourly productivity.

 

2- Norway – 1427 average annual hours with $46.97 hourly productivity.

 

3- Australia – 1664.2 average annual hours with $38.51hourly productivity.

 

4- Switzerland – 1568.2 average annual hours with $36.62 hourly productivity.

 

5- Netherlands – 1425 average annual hours with $36.62 hourly productivity.

 

6- Germany – 1371 average annual hours with $33.52 hourly productivity.

 

7- Denmark – 1436 average annual hours with $31.18 hourly productivity.

 

8- United States – 1789 average annual hours with $30.56 hourly productivity.

 

9- Ireland – 1821.26 average annual hours with $29.87 hourly productivity.

 

10- Sweden – 1609 average annual hours with $29.17 hourly productivity.

 

Interestingly the United Kingdom could not make it to the top 10, sliding to the 16th place with 1677 average annual hours and $24.07hourly productivity.

As per the Happy Planet Index, Luxembourg stands at 16th place globally for life expectancy and well-being, and it is the 6th most equal country on the Index, with low levels of inequality.

Norway is second for well-being, and Australia is 12th. The UK on the other hand, ranks 34th, coming in at 19th for inequality.

Courtesy: ARY

About the Author

Syed Ammar Alavi

- is Lahore (Pakistan) based journalist & writer with 25-year experience in print, wire and broadcast forms of journalism. His major fields of interest are politics, film,tv,sports, climate change and technology